Three new artists became members of the Arkansas Craft Guild, Nancy Muffett Pirani, Pam Anderson, and Dorothy Anderson.

Pam Alexander, Alexander Designs, is a new member with her jewelry made of fine silver or bronze metal clay. Her earrings and necklaces are now on display at the member owned Arkansas Craft Gallery, downtown Mountain View.

She first fell in love with the look of fine silver and bronze jewelry in Little Rock at the Arkansas Arts Center and Museum School’s annual art sale. She started learning this process at the AAC, traveling there for classes weekly for nine months. Metal clay consists of microscopic particles of pure silver or bronze and a water-soluble, non-toxic, organic binder that burns off during firing. After the Precious Metal Clay (PMC) is molded, carved and refined, it is then fired in a kiln. PMC was developed in the early 1990s in Japan by metallurgist Masaki Morikawa. The difference in sterling silver and fine silver is the metals content. Sterling silver is 92.5% pure silver with 7.5% copper and other metals. Fine silver is 99.9% pure silver with only .1% other metals. Because of the higher content of other metals, sterling silver is more prone to tarnishing than fine silver.

Pam’s style relates to nature, with leaves, seeds, and flowers represented in her jewelry. She plans to continue taking classes. “I realize I may never be an accomplished artist, but I am having a lot of fun trying.”

She grew up on the family farm, the youngest of three children, and all three siblings earned college degrees to become accountants. Being a Certified Public Accountant is a very demanding profession which did not allow time to explore her creative side. “I have always appreciated art, but art was never the center of my education. Only after marrying into a very artistic family, did I begin to develop the creative side of my brain and to explore the possibilities of what I can create with my hands.” After purchasing property near the White River, on weekends she started making garden art pieces. She joined the Off the Beaten Path Studio Tour 14 years ago with both her stained glass mosaics and large iron art using cold bending and welding, both self-taught crafts. After retiring 8 ½ years ago, she took a blacksmithing class and classes in metal jewelry at the Arkansas Craft School, Mountain View. She and her photographer husband Ed live atop Wildcat Mountain overlooking the White River and the valley not far from Sylamore.

Both Pam and Ed volunteer at the Gallery one day a month, a regular feature for the member owned cooperative, with artists hosting on Fridays and Saturdays.

Nancy Muffett Pirani is a new Guild member from Heber Springs. She now has Ponderosa Bliss scented soy candles for sale at an affordable price in the Gallery. “About 20 years ago I learned on my own how to make scented soy wax candles and fell in love with the process. This was my way of de-stressing after a long day of a highly stressful corporate job. Having been 36 years in the corporate world it was time to make a break, escape the rat race and do something better. I retired, my husband and I sold our condo, packed our bags and literally ran from the big city of Memphis to the beautiful small Ozark town of Heber Springs, where I finally found my own way and started doing something I love, my own business, Ponderosa Bliss, LCC.”

The ingredients used in her scented soy wax candles are of the highest quality. The soy wax is made from American grown soybeans, environmentally safe. The glassware is washable and reusable, classic 8 oz. mason jars, and upcycled fine crystal or elegant glassware from estate sales and flea markets. Candle wicks are 100% braided cotton or wooden. Soy candles burn cooler, 102 degrees, and cleaner than petroleum based paraffin candles, lasting 30-50% longer. No colorants in the candles means fewer potential allergens or toxins in the air. Wax spills can be cleaned up with soap and hot water. The Scented Soy Wax Melts in a packet of 6 can be used as a cuticle oil for hands and feet. It can be used as an under eye moisturizer, dry skin creme, or hair conditioner for brittle ends.

Dorothy Anderson, whose business is Dot’s World of Valley Springs, is a new member with embroidered artwork and Christmas greeting cards featuring needlework designs are currently available at the Arkansas Craft Gallery, member cooperative just off the Square, Mountain View.

After traveling for 30 years with her husband Bobby, who was in the Army, they retired to the Ozarks. Dorothy took a Master Art class at the ICS School of Art, and studied for many years with art teacher Jo Rowell. She took woodcarving with Jack Ryan at the North Arkansas College, Harrison. After taking classes with AR-EHC in sewing and crochet, she became a Master instructor in these crafts, teaching at North Arkansas College EDU-Continuing Education.

Her teaching experience is being put to good use currently as an instructor at the Arkansas Craft School in Mountain View. She enjoys spending time with students and sharing her knowledge, while adding to her own skills. Her skill set includes hand embroidery, quilting, crocheting, wood carving, wood burning, pen and ink, colored pencil, acrylic and oil painting.

As a member of The Palette Art League, Yellville, she is included in their book, “The Art and Artists of the Ozarks, Vol. 1.” She also has two other books, compiled and illustrated by Dorothy Anderson, “Ready – Set – Sew” and “Frank and Firsco’s Great Adventure.” Original artwork for Dot’s embroidered pictures is by artist Carole T. Jones, also a member of the Arkansas Craft Guild, whom she met at the Palette Art League. “She was impressed with my hand work and she wanted me to do some of her pictures, giving me permission to use any and all of her pictures.” Dorothy will do embroidered pictures by request, dotsworld@yellville.net. All one has to do is send a picture of their pet or whatever and a deposit of $50.00, with full payment due upon completion.

While visiting the Arkansas Craft Gallery at 104 E. Main, Mountain View, enter your name for a cash prize of $106.10 drawing Nov. 26. Everything is 10% off during Nov. 23 and 24 Black Friday and Shop Small promotions.

Contact information for each artist:

Pam Alexander

Alexander Designs

644 Wildcat Mountain

Melbourne, AR 72556

870-219-3280

palexander3280@yahoo.com

Nancy Muffett Pirani

Ponderosa Bliss, LLC

200 Stonewall

Heber Springs, AR 72543

870-702-1392

ponderosabliss@gmail.com

ponderosabliss.com

Dorothy Anderson

Dot’s World

228 Pine Lane

Valley Springs, AR 72682

870-204-2665/cell, 870-449-6565/home

dotsworld@yellville.net

thanks for your consideration for publication,

Sue Lukens, Sec.-Treas.


Arkansas Craft Guild & Gallery

“Promoting Handcrafted in Arkansas since 1962”

Website: www.arkansascraftguild.org
Phone: 870-269-4120
Email Address: arkansascraftguild@gmail.com

Gallery Shipping Address: 104 East Main Street, Mountain View, AR 72560

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 800, Mountain View, AR 72560

Gallery hours: 10 am to 5 pm Tuesday – Saturday

Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/arkansascraftgallery

Cathy Drew is a life long resident of the region that she loves to promote! As a matter of fact, she was born in Downtown Batesville in the late ’60s in one of the eight counties she now loves to encourage people to visit.
Drew is married to her husband of 27 years, Jeff Drew. Jeff and Cathy have a son, Jonathon (Jon) Drew and his wife Devyn Stewart and can’t leave out her grandson Jase Drew. Of course Drew can’t skip the other part of her family, the pets! Lady Bird (a stray that was welcomed into their home June 2012) and of course Howard – the puppy was compliments of Lady Bird shortly after arrival at the Drew home. They also have Kasha which Cathy inherited when your mother passed in 2016 and they adopted Bullet a stray in November of 2016 and the newest arrival Bullet a stray adopted into the family.

Drew, part of Ozark Gateway Region since 1990 while working at the ad agency (The Media Market Inc.) for the association where she helped produce their annual tabloid publication. She began work as the director of the Ozark Gateway Region June, 2000.